The Current State of Educational Technology

I’m starting to feel like a technology curmudgeon.

I’ve been thinking for a while about how technology should be used in schools. Around 3 years ago I started pushing for more access to technology in my district, and I would like to think my motivation was righteous; I saw possibilities to enhance student engagement and learning but didn’t have the ability to do so because of filters/policies/lack of hardware. So I pushed. And pushed.

The first result was the ability to pilot Google Apps for Education with my kids. I had them do a research project where they investigated types of forces and used Google Docs to compile their research. It was neat, and pretty cutting edge for my district at the time (circa 2010). Did they learn how to use Google docs and how to collaborate? Sure. Did they learn any physics? I honestly doubt it.

Then from 2010-2012 I was able to acquire probeware that collects digital data for physics, then we use computers with a program called LoggerPro to analyze the data. One of the great things LoggerPro does is allows for video analysis, such that we can plot position, velocity, and acceleration vs. time for objects within the video frame. For quite some time the workflow was as follows; we would collect the data using cameras, walk to the computer lab, upload and analyze the data, then print the graphs so we could discuss it the next day.

Fast forward to 2012. I somehow was able to convince someone to give me 10 laptops to use in my room. The very first day they were ready I ran into an interesting problem with some data students had collected. Some said the data indicated a linear relationship, some said quadratic. We had 15 minutes left of class, and I made a snap decision; go re-collect the data, this time being very careful when doing the video analysis. We came back together, and sure enough every graph was linear.

This would not be possible without the technology accessible to me at that very moment. But where would this activity fit on the SAMR model? I’m not sure that really matters. In this case, kids were certainly learning more physics, though not as much about how to use technology, since LoggerPro isn’t as scalable to life-outside-school as is using Google docs. Does that make one better than the other? Depends on your objectives, I imagine. But the point I want to make was that I didn’t need extensive training to redefine my technology use in the classroom; instead I needed students to have immediate access to the technology so that they could use it in the moment for learning. My training on how students learn physics through experiences was far more valuable than learning the technology itself.

For the last two school years I have held a half-time position in my district as a technology integration specialist. This year in particular has been amazing, as we have been able to hire enough TOSAs to have a team of us who collaborate to help teachers integrate tech as well as to investigate and make decisions regarding the future of technology in our schools. I love that my boss significantly weighs our input in making decisions. My question right now is what direction these decisions should head in the area of technology integration and professional development.

A couple weeks ago I had a brief twitter conversation with a few others regarding how we (as tech trainers) help staff use technology effectively.

What I mean is that I think a focus on SAMR (or any other tech-focused PD model) loses the forest in the trees. The tech isn’t the focus; learning is.

Then at the TIES 2013 conference, my by far favorite session of day one was given by George Couros, who definitely didn’t mention any websites I can use in class tomorrow. Instead, he said this;

The biggest game changer in education is the way our teachers think.

He also showed us what success looks like. And told us to be more dog. And to jump.

But seriously. Is moving education forward really about using the flashy new game you learned? Or is it about using good pedagogy, then having tools at your disposal to be able to utilize that pedagogy? I think the answer is clearly the latter, but the majority of time, money, and effort seems focused on devices and software rather than on how students learn.

Time to change that.

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2 responses to “The Current State of Educational Technology

  1. > I made a snap decision
    > kids were certainly learning more physics
    We need to look at teachers more as highly trained professionals capable of making decisions on the fly as to the best path to teach the student. Over prescribing for the teacher is harmful just as over prescribing for the student is harmful.

  2. Pingback: What Makes For Good Ed Tech? An ISTE 2014 Reflection | LEARNINGANDPHYSICS

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