CVPM Unit Summary

I only have one standard for CVPM, as I didn’t want to get bogged down with a super granular standard list.

CVPM.1: I can represent a constant velocity problems graphically and algebraically and solve problems using both numeric and algebraic methods.

I start day one of my essentially honors level, first year physics course with the Buggy Lab. (If you’re not familiar with the Buggy Lab, or even if you are, read Kelly’s post about it). This takes 2 full days, sometimes 2.5, with 45 minute periods.

From there I use Practice 1 stolen from Kelly, found in my CVPM Packet, which takes me about a day and a half (of 45 minute periods). Here’s a post about the board meeting to discuss the data.

Days 5-6 or so are the Cart Launch Lab. Here’s a picture of my notes while students discussed the data in a board meeting.

Next is Practice 2, also stolen from Kelly, though I add that we walk them with motion detectors, 1 day ish. (Update: Whiteboarding took the whole period and I decided that that was more worthwhile than actually walking them with motion detectors, we’ll do more of that in CAPM)

The last worksheet is Practice 3, which I developed to help develop more algebraic problem solving. This is because my class is actually a U of MN class taught at the HS level, and the U emphasizes algebraic problem solving. 2 days. This worksheet went very well, and here are some notes about starting the whiteboarding process with it as well as the ensuing conversation.

After Practice 3 I  have two days of difficult problem solving practice. The first is the standard lab practicum where students must cause two buggies of different speeds to head-on crash at a particular location. Here’s a post describing the practicum.  The second is a difficult, context rich problem that students work on in groups.

All in all the unit takes me  13-14 days, including the quiz at the end and a day to FCI pretest.

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One response to “CVPM Unit Summary

  1. Thanks for the unit summary! I like seeing how others break it down (especially in terms of time) and what practice they give their kids. Incredibly helpful.

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